Latest update: September 24, 2018


ProGT120 (PgfS)

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ProGT ID ProGT120 (PgfS)
Organism Information
Organism NameStreptococcus mutans
Clinical ImplicationPathogenic
DomainBacteria
PhylumFirmicutes
ClassificationFamily: Enterococcaceae
Order: Lactobacillales
Class: Bacilli
Phylum: Firmicutes
Taxonomic ID (NCBI)1309
Genome Information
Gene Information
Gene Namesmu2067c (pgfS)
Protein information
Protein NamePgfS 
Function in Native Organism 1) PgfS is a glycosyltransferase required for glycosylation of collagen- and laminin-binding adhesin Cnm and wall-associated protein A (WapA).
Potential Application1) Pgf modification system could be a new target for the development of antibiotic against S. mutans and, possibly, other Streptococci.
2) Better understanding of how the Pgf system functions can potentially lead to the utilization of this system as a new tool in synthetic biology for the modification of recombinant proteins used for therapeutic and non-therapeutic purposes.
Additional Information1) PgfS is a GT-A type glycosyltransferase, it glycosylates the Cnm protein, which contributes to invasion of host cells and virulence in the G. mellonella model.
2) Posttranslational modification increases the proteolytic stability of Cnm and WapA.
Glycosyltransferase Information
Glycosylation TypeO- (Ser/Thr) linked 
EC Number (BRENDA)2.4.1.-
Mechanism of Glycan TransferSequential
Donor TypeNucleotide activated sugars
Accessory GT IDProGT120.1 ProGT120.2 ProGT120.3
Glycan Information
Experimental_strategiesIn vivo  
Acceptor Subtrate Information
Acceptor Substrate name WapA
ProGPdb ID ProGP684
Acceptor Substrate name Cnm
ProGPdb ID ProGP685
Litrature
Year Of Validation2018 
Reference Avilés-Reyes, A., Freires, I.A., Besingi, R., Purushotham, S., Deivanayagam, C., Brady, L.J., Abranches, J. & Lemos, J. A. (2018). Characterization of the pgf operon involved in the posttranslational modification of Streptococcus mutans surface proteins. Scientific reports, 8(1), 4705.

Authors Avilés-Reyes, A., Freires, I.A., Besingi, R., Purushotham, S., Deivanayagam, C., Brady, L.J., Abranches, J. & Lemos, J. A.
Research groups1 Department of Oral Biology, University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Gainesville, FL, USA. 2 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA. 3 Department of Oral Biology, University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Gainesville, FL, USA. jabranches@dental.ufl.edu. 4 Department of Oral Biology, University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Gainesville, FL, USA. jlemos@dental.ufl.edu.
Corresponding Author Lemos, J. A.
ContactsDepartment of Oral Biology, University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Gainesville, FL, USA.
Reference Avilés-Reyes, A., Miller, J. H., Simpson-Haidaris, P. J., Hagen, F. K., Abranches, J., & Lemos, J. A. (2014). Modification of Streptococcus mutans Cnm by PgfS contributes to adhesion, endothelial cell invasion and virulence. Journal of bacteriology, JB-01783.

Authors Avilés-Reyes, A., Miller, J. H., Simpson-Haidaris, P. J., Hagen, F. K., Abranches, J., & Lemos, J. A.
Research groups1 Center for Oral Biology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA. 2 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA. 2 Center for Oral Biology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA. 3 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA Department of Medicine/Hematology-Oncology Division, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA. 4 Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA. 5 Center for Oral Biology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA.
Corresponding Author Lemos, J. A.
Contacts1 Center for Oral Biology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA. 2 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA. 2 Center for Oral Biology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA. 3 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA Department of Medicine/Hematology-Oncology Division, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA. 4 Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA. 5 Center for Oral Biology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA.